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Making the Switch to Sustainable Fashion

united change makers, switch to sustainable, organic jeans

The word ‘sustainable’ gets thrown around a lot these days doesn’t it? We are in the midst of a climate crisis so any and all steps we can take to live a little more consciously the better, but how can we be more sustainable when it comes to our wardrobes?

Sustainability is an umbrella term and it’s meaning can differ from one person to the next. In becoming more sustainable you first need to decide what aspect of sustainability matters to you most, whether it be vegan, environmental impacts or ethically run factories – or all the above! Now, we hate to break it to you, but there is no such thing as being 100% sustainable when it comes to your wardrobe; the industry will always have an impact on the environment, as well as the way you shop and the way you wash your clothes. All of our action have an impact, but it’s how we educate and actively reduce our impact that benefits the people and planet.

Have a clear out – having things in your wardrobe you never wear is a waste. There are so many options for your unloved clothes nowadays don’t leave them lurking in the back f the wardrobe when someone else can be wearing them. Does fit? It’ll fit someone else. Etc.

Begin to shop more sustainably, buy because you need it not because you want it. Make smarter decisions and invest in quality clothing. Shop with eco friendly and ethically inspired shops and do your research.

 

Get inspired:

Do Your Research

When discussing ethical and sustainable fashion there is one stand out event in fashion’s history which will always be known as a huge, and entirely avoidable, catalyst for change.

Fashion Revolution is a great resource to get you started in the world of sustainability and fashion. Fashion Revolution was born as a result of the Rana Plaza factory collapse with the mission to unite people in the fight against fast fashion and work towards changing the industry for the better.

 

Other great resources to get you started are:

This is a great site for all things ethical, covering sustainable fashion, food and other lifestyle topics.

If you’re a podcast lover then this one is a good one to keep up with. Kestrel Jenkins’ knowledge and conversations with industry specialists is always interesting and informative.

We’d love to add to this list with your favourite bloggers and influencers!

 

The True Cost Documentary (Now on Netflix)

This is a story all about fashion, and a story which has inspired so many people around the world. The documentary focuses on the clothes we wear, the people who make them and the impact the industry is having on the world. It’s launch in 2015 was groundbreaking. It delved deep into the untold story of fashion and inspired a generation to think about the impact of fashion.

We are living in an age where the price of our clothing is dropping, but with this comes a rise in the human and environmental costs. This is the thesis of the documentary, who really pays the price for our clothing?

For anyone who hasn’t seen the film, it is a powerful introduction to sustainable fashion. It perfectly pulls back the curtain on consumerism and exposes the true ecological cost of fashion.

Fashion’s Dirty Secrets

Stacey Dooley’s Fashion’s Dirty Secrets first aired on BBC Three back in October 2018. The short film focused on water and fashions favourite fibre – cotton.

It is an interesting watch, especially from a documentary which didn’t focus on plastic and microfibres which is a big talking point for the fashion industry at the moment. It’s important that all sides of the industry are investigated and debated, and we can’t forget about the natural fibres – it’s not always as green and clean as things seem.

The message we take home is to shop sustainability and be more considerate consumer. Buying less and investing in key pieces for your wardrobe will less the impact fashion has on our environment.

 Above image is figure 1: Photo by Sylvie Tittel on Unsplash

www.unitedchangemakers.com

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